Saturday, December 26, 2009

Steven Ross' sad tale - "To survive, we were resorting to cannibalism"; Shows kids animal figurines "made from the crushed bones of Jews"








Steve Ross (real name Szmulek Rozental) is the founder of The New England Holocaust Memorial in Boston. He says he survived 10 camps, and that one time he hid from the Nazis in an outhouse submerged up to his neck in human excrement. On the Holo circuit, he shows the kiddies animal figurines allegedly made from the crushed bones of Jews.



Article #1: "Holocaust survivor recalls tale of Kristallnacht"



Read more of his tale from The New England Holocaust Memorial.





Note: use http://www.archive.org/ to find articles if original links no longer work

5 comments:

  1. So they have a Holocaust Memorial in New England do they ? I bet if you placed a map of Europe in front of everyone who visited the place, less than five percent would be able to identify Poland, let alone locate any holohoax sites.

    Would it not be better for Americans to build a memorial to their own native population - the so-called "Red Indians" - who were driven off their lands or wiped out altogether, rather than invite some old Jew round to bore everyone to death with a collection of false memories and outright fairy tales.

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  2. Stephan Ross originally wanted the memorial to about the American Liberators of the victims of the holocaust. According to your logic, a memorial on American soil, should be about Americans. That would make a look more sense. But unfortunately, a segment of the Boston community, thought it should be a more general Holocaust memorial, and they eventually won the debate. So please don't blame Stephan Ross, if the memorial is not "American" enough for you. As an aside, Stephan eventually served in the US Army, and later gave a speech in congress in the 1980s, supporting a law to ban the burning of the American flag. So he also an "old American".

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    1. Oh, I see, Stephan really wanted a memorial to the US liberators of the camps in WW2, but his proposal was unceremoniously dumped by "a segment of the Boston community".

      Now that's a very coy statement to make; I wonder if this community segment began with a "J" and ended in an "S"!

      And you say that this segment eventually won the debate. But I would hazard a guess that the word "won" could easily be replaced by "rail-roaded".

      I am most intrigued by your claim that Stephan Ross served in the US army. I would be most grateful if you could supply us with details of his military service, regiment, rank and campaign medals. You inform us that he gave a speech in the US Congress, supporting a law banning the burning of the American flag. But, to be perfectly honest, this was not a particularly courageous thing to do - anyone can stand up there, deliver the same speech, and win a glowing round of applause!

      If, as you say, Stephan's proposal for a memorial to American servicemen was rejected, and he himself was a military veteran, then he must have been very hurt and bruised by this rejection. Therefore, I do find it rather strange that in the image above he is wearing a cap worn by a concentration camp inmate, and not the cap of a proud US veteran.

      But lastly, let us consider the weirdness of establishing a holocaust memorial in Boston. Surely the United States of America only needs one of these shrines - ie;-The National Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC would be quite sufficient for the US nation. After all, the overwhelming majority of US citizens had nothing to do with the holocaust - either as victims, or as liberators. I mean to say, can you imagine an absurd scenario whereby Native American Indian memorials are opening up all over Poland - in cities like Krakow, Warsaw, Katowice, Poznan and Lodz?

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  3. The type of memorial, or museum, which should really be opened in the United States of America, is the one that was planned overlooking New York Harbour in 1913. As the brainchild of wealthy retailer - Rodham Wanamaker, work began on the project immediately after the site was unveiled to loud fanfare by the great and the good of American Society.

    Unfortunately, the project failed due to a lack of funds, and previously favourable newspaper support quickly turned to scorn and contempt - calling the scheme "philanthropic humbug".

    Note the fickle nature of the newspapers even back then. But I think we can be absolutely certain that the jewish owned or controlled media of today would not dare describe the 40-plus holocaust memorials and museums, scattered across the USA, as "philanthropic humbug".

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  4. Links are not working anymore. But here are two other.
    20% of the men guarding the jews were homosexuals and molested him, he survived 10 camps and 1 ounce of bread had to be divided among 20 people.
    http://www.southcoasttoday.com/article/20110414/pub03/104140355
    http://www.massnews.com/past_issues/other/4_Apr/aprhol.htm
    Enjoy!

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